Storify reinvents online storytelling

This story from the 10,000 words blog (I know I reference it a lot, but it’s such a good source on the topic) introduces a method of chronologically compiling social media tools to create one, cohesive story: Storify. This tool allows you to aggregate things like Twitter messages, Facebook updates and online video. Journalism is so much about storytelling, and learning about Storify could really change the way it’s done in online, social media journalism.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Blog lists are in

This article on Journalistics looks at why ranking and lists posts are so popular in the blogging sphere. It examines the topic because lists drive traffic, and that’s important in any sort of social media journalism. It’s interesting because online journalism is constantly looking for new ways to present information to an audience growing more and more fast-paced. Lists are one way to do that, and Journalistics looks at why and how.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Tagging photos in journalism

Mark Luckie brings a new idea to the world of social media journalism with the idea of tagging photos in a crowd with this post. This is an interesting concept because it invites people to tag themselves in photos, emphasizing the connection between the media source and the community to which it reports. This adds a whole new level to photojournalism, where people can actually identify with the photo, and thus identify with the story and the issue.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

New blog focuses on Twitter

Romenesko posted about the newest blog devoted to the world of social media and journalism: AllTwitter. This site is all about covering things via Twitter, using Twitter effectively and all the latest news about the social media network. It will be an interesting site to follow in the coming weeks to see what information can be mined from it about Twitter and journalism.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Twitter and breaking news

LostRemote published a piece that delves into the workings of @breakingnews, a project from msnbc.com that curates breaking news from all different news sources and brings them together on Twitter. Now, it gathers even more sources, using citizen journalists as well. This is an important trend in news journalism because not only does it change the way that news is brought together and covered by major networks, but it’s a trend that is important to follow in the world of journalism.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Social media site for journalists

I found this post on the Nieman Journalism Lab, and while it’s old, I think it is really interesting and very relevant. It discusses a site called Journalisted, which is essentially a social media site for journalists, rather than for journalism. It is extremely important in the world of today, where things are posted online via blogs, Facebook, Twitter and the like by anyone and everyone. Who should you trust? This site has profiles for different journalists to help other journalists know who to follow and who really is a nobody.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Online journalism and the 2010 election

Mark Luckie’s roundup of the 2010 election coverage is interesting to any journalist looking to succeed in a field that is quickly moving toward the online scene. It looks at the use of video, graphics and flash options. One of the more relevant parts of this post to this curation is when he looks at the use of social media in the coverage, including the Washington Post‘s and CNN’s use of Twitter and TBD.com’s encouragement of its users to use Foursquare as a way to stay updated.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment